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Kahului Union Church
101 W. Kamehameha Ave.
Kahului, Hawaii 96732
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Ph: 808-871-4422


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Kahului Union Church
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Online Christian Resources

The internet has allowed access to a wealth of Christian resources as never before. This page is designed to be a starting point to assist you in walking with Christ. Enjoy!

growing deeper Growing Deeper
Alpha-Omega Ministries
The Christian Apologetics Ministry of James R. White.

Bible Bulletin Board
Every article and sermon that is posted here is carefully scrutinized to ensure that it conforms to true Bible doctrine.

Bible Reading Plan
Heartlight has brought together several Bible reading plans to choose from. Find one that suits your tastes, and dig in!

The Blue Letter Bible Institute
Studies geared to the personal schedule and goals of the individual.

Christian Apologetics & Research Ministry
To equip Christians with good information on doctrine, various religious groups, cults, Evolution, New Age, and related subjects.

ChristianCourses.com
Reaching learners worldwide with affordable and accessible Christian worldview learning opportunities.

The Gospel Coalition
Our desire is to serve the church we love by inviting all our brothers and sisters to join us in an effort to renew the contemporary church in the ancient gospel of Christ so that we truly speak and live for him in a way that clearly communicates to our age.

Monergism
To encourage the church to always be reforming its thoughts in order to be more God-honoring & consistent with the Word of God.

Online Commentaries by CrossWalk.com
Select from a variety of Bible commentaries, all free, all online!

Online Devotionals by CrossWalk.com
Select from a variety of Devotionals, all free, all online!

Online Lexicons by CrossWalk.com
The Greek & Hebrew Lexicons have been designed to help the user understand the original text of the Bible.

Phil Johnson's Bookmarks
Helpful links on theology, and other stuff from Phil Johnson, Executive Director of Grace to You, and Elder at Grace Community Church in Panorama City, CA.

Stand To Reason
Training Christians to think more clearly about their faith and to make an even-handed, incisive, yet gracious defense for classical Christianity and classical Christian values in the public square.

online magazines Online Magazines
Boundless
CCM Magazine
Christian History & Biography
Christian Parenting (MomSense)
Christianity Today
Citizen Magazine
Decision Magazine
Discipleship Journal
Heartlight
Kyria
Leadership Journal
Marriage Partnership
Men of Integrity
Plugged In
Sports Spectrum
Today's Christian

CHRISTIAN E-CARDS
ChristiaNet
Cross Daily
Crosswalk.com
Encouragement Cards
Heart Cards

Misc. Resources
Pacific Justice Institute
Pacific Justice Institute is a non-profit 501(c)(3) legal defense organization specializing in the defense of religious freedom, parental rights, and other civil liberties. Pacific Justice Institute works diligently, without charge, to provide their clients with all the legal support they need.

Rutherford Institute, The
Founded in 1982 by constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead, The Rutherford Institute is a civil liberties organization that provides free legal services to people whose constitutional and human rights have been threatened or violated.

oneplace.com Listen Online
Answers In Genesis
Answers equips Christians to provide answers to a 'doubting' world in a so-called age of science. Ken Ham speaks on creation/evolution issues and encourages the body of Christ to trust in the authority of God's Word.

Bible Answer Man
Let Christian Research Institute President Hank Hanegraaff and his guests equip you to defend your faith against errors and false teachers, and help you stay strong in your walk with the Lord.

The Bible Study Hour
With Dr. James Boice, providing careful, in-depth Bible study, teaching you how to think and act biblically.

Breakpoint
Chuck Colson offers a Christian perspective on news and trends.

Desiring God Radio
Are you wasting your life? Is there a single, all-satisfying, unifying passion to live for? Join John Piper on the dangerous quest for maximum joy in God. But beware, it may cost you your life. Never mind - "the steadfast love of the Lord is better than life" (Psalm 63:3).

Family Life Today
FamilyLife Today is conversational in nature and provides practical, biblical tools to address the issues affecting your family. You'll receive motivation, encouragement, and help.

Focal Point Radio Ministries
Mike Fabarez has a passion for people to know the Word of God and to see how God can dramatically change their lives. Easy to listen to - while spiritually gripping - the Focal Point is always on Jesus Christ.

Grace To You
This powerful broadcast will boost your spiritual growth by helping you understand and apply God's Word to your life and the life of your family and church. John MacArthur, pastor-teacher, has been offering his practical, verse-by-verse Bible teaching through Grace to You for nearly 30 years.

Grace To You Weekend
This powerful broadcast will boost your spiritual growth by helping you understand and apply God's Word to your life and the life of your family and church. John MacArthur, pastor-teacher, has been offering his practical, verse-by-verse Bible teaching through Grace to You for nearly 30 years.

Insight For Living
the Bible-teaching radio ministry of author and pastor Charles R. Swindoll. Insight for Living is committed to excellence in communicating biblical truth and its application.

Jay Sekulow Live!
Listen to Jay Sekulow speak about the protection of religious freedoms in America.

Portraits Of Grace
"Portraits of Grace" is exactly that...John MacArthur's one-minute snapshots of Biblical Truth that accurately communicate God's Word with grace, value and practical application to life.

Renewal Radio
This fifteen-minute daily program presents biblical truth in a relevant and practical way.

Christian Answers Network


Christianity Today
New This Week

Cover Story: Facing Our Legacy of Lynching

How a memorial could help lead America—and Christians—to repentance from a dark history.

In 1902 a black man named Alonzo Tucker was lynched from a bridge in the coastal town of Coos Bay, Oregon, a few hours south of my home. It is the only lynching on record in the state, and the limited known details were enough to catch my throat. Tucker had been accused of assaulting a white woman, and an angry mob had formed to take his life in the streets. He was jailed, partly to protect him from the crowds. But at some point, he panicked and somehow escaped, hiding for a night beneath some docks.

In the morning, a band of men found Tucker and shot him as he tried to run away. Tucker may have died from his wounds—no one knows for certain—but to make sure he was dead and to make a spectacle of the event, the crowd hung Tucker from the Fourth Street Bridge, right in the heart of that small Oregon coal-mining town.

I stumbled upon Tucker’s story while researching racial injustice in Oregon and couldn’t get it out of my mind. We had a family beach trip coming up, and I told my husband we needed to detour through Coos Bay to visit the site where Tucker died. He drove to the hardware store, bought some lumber, and made a large white cross to bring with us.

Once in town, I couldn’t find the Fourth Street Bridge. My husband dropped me at the local history museum and took our kids to play in a park. I awkwardly brought up the lynching with the man at the museum, who knew exactly what I was referring to. He gave me as much information as he had, making copies from local history books. I asked him if the museum would ever consider making an exhibit about Tucker, but the man shook his head sadly. “We just don’t have enough information” he said. “There isn’t even a single photo ...

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I?m a Rare Breed: An Elite Chess Player Who?s Open About His Faith

Why I follow Jesus publicly, even when people warn that my career will suffer.

On the small planet where elite chess players dwell, very few people worship Jesus Christ. If anyone discovers that you’re one of those “superstitious,” “narrow-minded idiots,” you’re likely to see nasty comments accumulate on your Facebook fan page. On a regular basis, I receive emails from strangers lecturing me about the dangers of following Jesus. Out of pity or disgust, they wonder how I, the world’s second-ranked chess player, can be so “weak-minded.”

I have been assured that identifying openly as a Christian will interfere with sponsorship, support, and invitations to events. I have been told that spending time reading my Bible, praying, and going to church will inevitably weaken my performance. People plead with me to at least keep quiet. They say thanking God publicly makes me look ridiculous.

So why did I make such a risky move?

Playing it Safe

The Philippines, where I grew up, is a country of God-seekers. People mention God all the time, in just about every context. Everyone believes he exists, even if they’re unwilling to claim much more than that.

As a child, I was informed that you needed to be a good person so that God would give you certain blessings, like food and jobs—which are very important in such a poor country. But this confused me, because it seemed like the bad people received more than the good people. I knew of many famous crooks who went to church, wore religious symbols, and got tattoos of Jesus or a crucifix—and they were pretty rich.

Clearly, many popular beliefs and practices were less a matter of worshiping God than of appeasing the god of luck. One legend had it that if you rubbed a particular part of a particular statue, ...

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Commentary: It?s Not Only Bullies Who Boast

We?re too quick to ignore one of Paul?s most persistent warnings.

This is a good year to think about boasting. That’s true for at least three reasons. Trivially, because American public discourse involves an unusual amount of boasting. (We’ll fix health care for good, or crush ISIS, or “make America great again.”) Historically, because this is the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, which Martin Luther (among others) saw as a call for the church to boast not in works, but solely in the Cross of Christ. Theologically, because the contemporary church hardly ever mentions the concept—even though the apostle Paul mentioned it dozens of times in just a few short letters.

The problem could be our fairly childish perspective on what counts as “boasting.” To modern ears, it sounds like a six-year-old saying, “My dad is bigger than your dad,” or a professional wrestler’s trash-talk, or perhaps a presidential Twitter feed. So when we hear Paul railing against boasting in anything other than Christ crucified, we might assume it doesn’t apply to us. Boasting? I haven’t done that since “I’m the king of the castle.”

In the ancient world, however, boasting was not just child’s play; it was deadly serious. You would boast as you went into battle, reassuring yourself that victory was certain. Goliath did it to David: “Come to me, and I will give your flesh to the birds of the air and to the beasts of the field” (1 Sam. 17:44, ESV throughout). Messengers from enemy nations did it to Jerusalem: One warning mocked “the men sitting on the wall, who are doomed with you to eat their own dung and drink their own urine” (Isa. 36:12). This sort of boasting has provided iconic moments in the history ...

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Are We Missing the Point of Spiritual Disciplines?

The goal isn't merely getting closer to God, but making a difference in everyday life.

One crisp fall morning, I watched my son’s first-grade soccer team attempt to play soccer. Many of his teammates had not played the game before that season. Even a few weeks in, the young athletes were struggling.

While watching, I thought back to their practice earlier in the week and found myself intrigued. During practice, they had executed drills without any problems. They had dribbled, taken shots, and even passed the ball to one another. They looked like they could play soccer—but their practice did not translate into the ability to play a real, live game.

I began to wonder: Why was there such a disconnect between the practice and the game? Were their practices really preparing them to play the game of soccer?

Then I began to think of our churches and ask similar questions. Like my son’s soccer team, don’t we sometimes experience a disconnect between real life and what we “practice” at church? Are Sunday school classes, small groups, and spiritual disciplines the equivalent of ineffectual soccer drills? Perhaps, even when Sunday school classes are full, small groups well attended, and spiritual disciplines regularly practiced, these practices are not helping us know how to love God and our neighbors in the nitty-gritty of real life.

Vertical and Horizontal

These are the kinds of questions Kyle David Bennett asks in Practices of Love: Spiritual Disciplines for the Life of the World. Bennett, a professor of philosophy and director of The Spirituality and Leadership Institute for Young Leaders at Caldwell University, is eager to show believers what it looks like to follow Jesus on the ground. Bennett believes that spiritual disciplines are supposed to help us as we seek to follow Jesus, ...

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The Beginning of Dementia Isn?t the End of Grace

How the church can come to the aid of sufferers and their loved ones.

In the era of modern medicine, a great many human afflictions can be treated, if not cured outright. Medicines easily defeat diseases that once would have killed us, while prosthetics and pain-relief drugs help us adapt to disabling symptoms and incurable illnesses. Dementia, unfortunately, remains neither curable nor especially treatable—and it is only getting more common as our population ages.

Dementia is especially fearsome in a culture like ours, one that treats autonomy as essential to human flourishing. Losing the ability to think and make rational decisions is always a profound loss, but it is especially terrifying for people who value independence so highly. Thankfully, Finding Grace in the Face of Dementia by physician John Dunlop is an excellent companion in thinking through the questions that dementia raises.

The first half of the book covers some basic theological precepts about sin, illness, and the body, as well as medical and scientific details about dementia. Dunlop then describes the daily experience of those who suffer from dementia and the people who care for them. Plenty of books and resources contain this sort of information, but this book remains immensely useful for anyone—pastors, family members, or even people in the early stages of dementia themselves—seeking basic facts about the disease and subjects like in-home care or nursing homes. Having spent many years caring for demented people at every possible stage, Dunlop helps readers step into the non-slip socks of a person with dementia and understand his or her frustrations and sorrows.

For the rest of the book, Dunlop asks whether we can find any grace in dementia. To do this, he first confronts the assumption that makes people ...

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Interview: Keith and Kristyn Getty: Singing Isn?t Just for Sunday

Why congregational worship is a feast we prepare all week long.

The Christian musical landscape includes dozens of widely known worship leaders and recording artists but comparatively few hymn writers. Of these, Keith and Kristyn Getty are preeminent. Their songs are enormously popular (over 40 million people sing “In Christ Alone” in church services each year, according to their website). And in June, Keith—who is from Northern Ireland—became the first contemporary Christian musician to be honored as an Officer of the Order of the British Empire, an award given by Queen Elizabeth II. Over the last decade, the Gettys have been leading seminars around the United States for pastors and ministers of music. This teaching work forms the foundation of their book Sing! How Worship Transforms Your Life, Family, and Church. Steve Guthrie, associate professor of theology at Belmont University (and head of the school’s Religion and the Arts program), spoke with Keith about reinvigorating the Christian practice of singing, in congregations and families alike.

With so many difficult issues facing the church today, why give special attention to congregational singing?

As evangelicals, we take the Bible as our authority. And when we look at the Bible, we find that, actually, the second most common command is to sing. It wouldn’t come up that often if it weren’t extremely important to God. Yet when Kristyn and I started studying this, we realized we couldn’t find good books on singing for ordinary people.

In 2013, we did a series of leadership lunches where we would ask the participants: “What’s the first question you ask about music in church?” And we got a whole range of answers, from production to musical style to personality to presentation. ...

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Parents of Prodigals: Let God Work on Your Anger and Fears

An excerpt from 'Hope for the Prodigal.'

Having a prodigal in our lives can expose us—in a good way—although the exposure doesn’t always feel beneficial at the start. We might not be prodigal ourselves, but ultimately, the crisis shows where we may have gone off the rails or developed false beliefs. God may allow or ordain circumstances that expose our attitudes and beliefs, revealing our deep need for God’s ongoing help.

When my son Christian was still in high school and going through his rebellious season, I (Jim) was senior pastor of Real Life Ministries, as I am now. Our town, Post Falls, Idaho, has a population of about 35,000, and our church has about 6,000 people, so we have a fairly large presence in town. Christian was known in high school, in the community, by the police, and by the church. Christian embarrassed himself and my wife and me publicly on many occasions. It was painful. His DUI and arrests for that and other things put us all in a poor light.

When a prodigal leaves home (or church), chaos and tension can enter a family. It’s much like a hurricane sweeping through. The prodigal leaves and others are left to clean up the mess. Some people try to ignore the problem; some become angry and blame others. Some give in to depression, and in grief over the broken relationships, they withdraw and isolate themselves. Some people live in regret—they dwell on what they wish they’d done or hadn’t done. For me, though I had been sober for many years, the temptation to retreat into alcohol was the strongest it had ever been.

When Christian was going through his difficult season, Lori and I disagreed on how to parent him and sometimes argued about it. The crisis exposed weaknesses in our marriage and in us as individuals. ...

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